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Ancient Ship Remains Found
ISSUE 211
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An ICG Official Says Somaliland's Claim To ‎Recognition Is “Consistent With The AU Charter.”‎

Abdillahi Yusuf Takes Refuge In Galkayo‎ After Falling Out With Geedi And Addis ‎Ababa

Muslims Voice Anger Over ‎Cartoons Mocking Prophet ‎Mohammed‎‎

What Is Going On In Somaliland ‎‎????‎‎‎

Somaliland Opposes Africa Call To Ease U.N. ‎Embargo‎

Somaliland Forum Denounces The Illegal ‎Exploration Contract Between RR. Ltd And ‎Puntland‎

Trouble Looms In Somalia As PM Rejects Sit Of ‎Parliament

Local & Regional Affairs

Seyoum Mesfin: Ethiopia Backs ‎Somaliland Trade, Not Sovereignty

Ancient Ship Remains Found‎

Somalia's Puntland Sold Exploration Rights In ‎Somaliland

Djibouti: Parliament Adopts New Standing ‎Orders

Ethiopia Bans Grain Exports To Stabilize Local ‎Market‎‎

Four Kenyans Starve To Death At A Somali ‎Town‎‎‎‎‎

Multi-National Force Deployed To ‎Combat Piracy Off East African Coast

U.S. Navy Hands Over Suspected Somali Pirates To ‎Kenya‎

Djibouti Becomes New Member Of ‎OPCW‎‎‎‎‎

Editorial
Special Report

International News

Exclusive: We'll Help Sink Pirate Gang‎‎‎‎‎‎‎

Libya Shuts Embassy In Denmark ‎Over ‘Blasphemous’ Cartoons‎‎

WFP Plans To Carry Out Humanitarian, ‎Development Works With 220m USD This ‎Year

Somali Man Shot Dead In London

Somaliland’s disheartening foreign policy needs an overhaul‎‎

FEATURES & COMMENTARY

Reality Check On Ismail Omar Guelleh

Support Offered To Welsh Somalis‎‎

Finnish Muslims Understand ‎Indignation Over Cartoons Of ‎Prophet Muhammad

The Worst Drought In Three Decades In ‎Somaliland‎

Notice Board

Opinions

Prolonging The Somali Crisis‎

Our Meetings With The ‎Ambassadors‎‎‎

Somaliland Integrity Versus Hunters Of ‎Opportunism

Joint Needs Assessment And Its ‎Implications For Somaliland‎

Rayale’s Foreign Trips And The ‎Chaos That Ensues On The Road To ‎The Airport

Is The JNA Poisonous Or Nutritional Pill?‎‎


Cairo, Egypt, Jan 30, 2006 (Zee News) – An American-Italian team of archaeologists has found the remains of 4,000-year-old ships that used to carry cargo between Pharaonic Egypt and the mysterious, exotic land of Punt, the Supreme Council of Antiquities has announced.

The ships' remains were found during a five-year excavation of five caves south of the Red Sea port of Safaga, about 300 miles southeast of Cairo, the chairman of the supreme council, Zahi Hawass, said in a statement late Thursday.

The archaeologists, who came from Boston and East Naples universities, found Pharaonic seals from the era of Sankhkare Mentuhotep III, one of seven rulers of the 11th dynasty, which lasted from about 2133 B.C. to 1991 B.C.. They also found wooden boxes, covered with gypsum, bearing the inscription "Wonders of the land of Punt."

For the ancient Egyptians, Punt was a source of prized goods such as incense, ivory, ebony, gum and the hides of giraffes and panthers that were worn by temple priests. But the precise location of Punt remains a mystery. Historians have variously placed it in Sudan, Eritrea or Somalia.

Hawass said the remains showed the ancient Egyptians were "excellent ship builders" and that they had a fleet capable of sailing to remote lands.

"All the pieces found are in good shape and they will be moved for restoration and display," Hawass added in the statement.

Other artifacts included 80 coils of rope and pieces of pottery that date to the reign of Mentuhotep III.

Bureau Report

 


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