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Somali Islamists Call National Forum

ISSUE 240
Front Page
Index
Headlines

Rayale Urged To Increase Women Representation In Government

Somaliland Seeks Us Help In Battle For Recognition

Somali Students Get US$200,000 Worth Of Books From Australia

Somali Islamists, Foreign Trainers Open Militia Camp

Mogadishu Port Reopened

Somali Taliban-Style Rebels Settle In

TFG To Work With Eritrean Rebel Group

Somali Info Considered For TV Bulletin Boards

Regional Affairs

Eritrea 'Ships Arms To Islamists'

Somalia: Islamic Courts Threaten Puntland

24th MEU Arrives In Africa For Training

African-American Senator Meets Kenya President On Visit To Father's Homeland

Somalis Now Seek Power Sharing Deal

Editorial
Special Report

International News

Israel/Lebanon: Evidence Indicates Deliberate Destruction Of Civilian Infrastructure

A Year Later, Family Still Searching For Justice

Norway: May Reconsider Return Of Somali Refugees

New Commission Ignores Inequality And Racism

Astronomers Say Pluto Is Not A Planet

SHARIA LAW FOR BUCCANEERS

China Goes On Safari

FEATURES & COMMENTARY

The Unspoken Half Of Black Hawk Down

South Africa's Asylum System Is At Breaking Point

Osama Would Vote Republican

Beware, From Mogadishu To Miami Al-Qaeda Now Wears A Black Face

And You Thought It Was Hard Starting A Business In Your Country…

Americans' Ignorance Of Foreign News Appalling

Food for thought

Opinions

Aids Became A Controversial Article

The Enemy Of The State Is Within

Why We Should Refuse Rayale’s Tour Of Deception

Open Letter to: Speaker of Somaliland House of Representatives

Non-Recognition Of Somaliland A Threat To Core U.S Interest

The House of Representatives: Don’t Just Talk the Talk; Walk the Walk to Save Somaliland

The Guurti Must Reform Gradually


Mogadishu , Somalia, August 20, 2006 – SOMALIA'S newly dominant Islamist movement says it will organize a national forum to chart the lawless country's future, further bypassing the weak government it threatens.

At the same time, the Supreme Islamic Council of Somalia (SICS) renewed vows to fight the deployment of a proposed east African peacekeeping force, plans for which were finalized last week, saying foreign troops were "not welcome."

In a move decried by the largely powerless transitional administration, the Supreme Islamic Council of Somalia (SICS) said today it would soon host a "national reconciliation conference" to set a new course for the country.

"We are inviting all the Somali people to attend a national reconciliation conference in Mogadishu," SICS spokesman Abdurahim Ali Muddey told reporters in the capital, which the Islamists seized from warlords in June.

He gave no date for the conference.

"Somalis need to talk to each other and resolve their differences at home without foreign interference," he said, sidestepping questions about whether the gathering was aimed at forming a government to rival the current one.

However, a senior Islamist official left little doubt of the intent of the meeting, denouncing the existing government and its repeated appeals for the deployment of regional peacekeepers to shore up its limited authority.

"The last solace for that administration is foreign military intervention that is not viable in Somalia," the official told AFP on condition of anonymity. "The Baidoa administration is a waste of time and resources."

In Baidoa, about 250km west of the capital where the transitional government is based due to insecurity in Mogadishu, officials immediately rejected the idea, saying it posed a direct challenge.

Government spokesman Abdrahman Dinari called the conference "unwarranted, irresponsible and a recipe for more political confusion", and urged the Islamists to accept Arab League mediation to resolve differences.

"The call for a new conference is aimed at undermining the existing government and we will not accept it," Mr. Dinari said.

"If the Islamists are interested in peace, they should attend the peace talks mediated by the Arab League."

Source: The Daily Telegraph


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