Home | Contact us | Links | Archives

Somalia to issue new passport
ISSUE 261
Front Page
Index
Headlines

Rising Tension In The Eastern Border Between Somaliland And Puntland

Letter To Somaliland’s President About His Unequal Battle With Newspaper

Mortars Hit Somalia's Presidential Palace

U.S. Optimistic on Direction Somalia Is Taking, Official Says

Somali Authorities Holding 'Some 50 Foreign Nationals'

Abdillahi Yusuf May Ask Somaliland To Give Up Disputed Regions In Return For Independence

Eritrean President Says AU Mission in Somalia Doomed to Failure

Ethiopia 'Set For Somali Pullout'

In Somaliland, Jailed Journalists Prosecuted Under Archaic Criminal Law

Regional Affairs

Somaliland Warns Of Regional War

Targeting Oromo Citizens In Somalia Is An Act Of Ethnic Cleansing

Editorial
Special Report

International News

Washington Admits Role In Illegal War: US Troops Took Part In Invasion Of Somalia

U.S. Disappointed By Somali Parliament's Move To Oust Speaker

The Post's Stewart Bell in Somalia

At the UN, Silence on Somalia and ICTY Pardon Request, Confidence on Kosovo

Who Is Osama Bin Laden?

Death and despair the 'benefits' of war on terror

Doctors Without Borders says Somalia Lacking Any Health Infrastructure

FEATURES & COMMENTARY

Bush War In Africa

Somalis Pin Peace Hopes On Yemen

''Somalia's Political Future Appears To Be Its Pre-Courts Past''

Illegal Acts In Africa

Somalia: Theatre Of Proxy Wars

THE OIL FACTOR IN SOMALIA

Food for thought

Opinions

The Predicament of Oromos in Somalia

Australian Scientist On A Short Visit To Amoud University

The Gadabuursi Manifesto

Seeds Of Dictatorship?

The True Inside Story About Southern Somalia

The Last Will And Testament Of The Last Somali Man Standing

We Are All In This Disgrace!

Free The Haatuf Journalists Now: This Is The Time All Of Us Need To Speak In One Voice!

Comments By Jamal Gabobe


The transitional government is trying to establish its authority in the capital, Mogadishu

War torn Mogadishu

Baidoa, Somalia, 17 January 2007 - Somalia's interim government is set to issue new passports in its headquarters in Baidoa for the first time since the civil war erupted in 1991.

Legislators also voted out on Wednesday the influential speaker of the Somali parliament who had tried to negotiate with the Council of Islamic Courts group.

The transitional government says its decision on passports is a response to the forging and selling of existing Somali passports, both inside and outside the country.

Abdullah Mahmud Javo, the immigration chief, said: "The Somali passport was easily available to non-Somalis.

"Drug dealers had forged passports. We now announce that old passports will be cancelled starting July 2007."

Border controls

The decision also aims to prevent the entry of foreigners or people the government calls "terrorists", source reported.

At the same time, the Somali foreign ministry has ordered its embassies around the world to grant travel visas to citizens or visitors wishing to enter Somalia.

"Of course we have to know why a foreigner would come to our country. We do not want Somalia to be open for people to come without the government's knowledge," Hussain Jamea, the Somali deputy foreign minister, said.

The Somali government has set July 2007 as the deadline for renewal of old passports. Applicants will have to hand over their old passport to obtain a new one.

The government said that old passports will automatically be cancelled. It is hoped that this new measure will reduce the obstacles faced by the Somali people travelling in the past.

Many countries had stopped recognising the Somali passport, which had forced many citizens to acquire new nationalities.

Speaker's dismissal

Wednesday's vote to dismiss the speaker, who is currently out of the country, garnered a total of 183 MPs gathered at the transitional government's base of Baidoa. Nine voted against the move.

Sharif Hassan Sheikh Aden angered many in November when he launched unauthorised negotiations with the Islamic courts, who were then ruling large parts of the country, including the capital, Mogadishu.

Mohammed Adow, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Mogadishu, said that the move to dismiss Sheikh Aden is all part of the government trying to deal with internal conflict.

"Sheikh Aden has always been seen as a renegade and someone who is opposed to the president and prime minister and, therefore, the issue of the parliament voting him out is seen as the government dealing with the conflict within itself," Adow said.

Since their removal late last month, the government has been trying to stamp its authority and end the factional fighting which has dogged Somalia for the past 16 years.

Adow also said that it did not seem likely that voting Sheikh Aden out would lead to violence in the capital, even though Sheikh Aden has support in some quarters of Mogadishu.

"The government continues to exert its authority all over Somalia and the capital," Adow said.

Somali watchers however have warned that the dismissal of Aden, a member of the Rahawein clan, could undermine stabilisation efforts and polarise the government and parliament, whose formation is based on a complex power-sharing alliance among fractious clans.

Source: AFP

 


Home | Contact us | Links | Archives