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U.N. head links climate change, Darfur

Issue 282
Front Page
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German Parliament Passes Resolution On Somaliland's Recognition, Stability

Breast Feeding Mother Jailed By Hargeysa Security Committee

Ethiopian Premier Says Forces To Stay In Somalia Until Situation Stabilizes

Somalis Die In Mogadishu Blasts

Canadian Border Officials Hired Private Jet To Deport Two Men To Djibouti

US Preparing Air-Strikes Against Al-Qaeda In Somalia: Official

Somalia appoints new defense minister
Reconciliation conference delayed again

Amnesty International’s Statement To The UN Human Rights Council

Somalia drafts media law, broadcasters back on air

Regional Affairs

Somali Peace Conference Postponed For Third Time

Navies urged to fight Somali pirates

Editorial
Special Report

International News

US seeks to spread Africa command staff

'Black Hawk' pilot to visit

"Islamic Terrorists" supported by Uncle Sam: Bush Administration "Black Ops" directed against Iran, Lebanon and Syria

FEATURES & COMMENTARY

Bringing Shelter To Needy Refugees

Human Rights Council takes up situation of human rights in Cambodia, Haiti and Somalia

Thank God, The G8 Gala Is Over

The Speech of Hon. Ali Ibrahim Mohamed, Minister of National Planning & Coordination

It’s Official: The Crash of the U.S. Economy has begun

PMR's Company Warns Of Economic Blockade; Risk Of Bankruptcy

Food for thought

Opinions

Will The Awdal Convention 2007 Match Haji Nur’s Feat ?

Letter To Editor

Somaliland Marches On!

Multi Dimensions Of The Politics Of Being Silent

The UN Renews Its Campaign Against Somali Livestock

Ungovernable Somalia And The Imminent Collision Of External Interests

What role would Ethiopia/USA play to tackle the Somaliland/Somalia issue?


Darfur refugees stand outside their make-shift shelters Sunday March 25, 2007, in this derelict section of Es Sallam camp. (Ap-photo)

WASHINGTON, 16 June 2007 - Climate change is partly to blame for the conflict in Sudan's Darfur region, where droughts have provoked fighting over water sources, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in an editorial published Saturday.

"Almost invariably, we discuss Darfur in a convenient military and political shorthand — an ethnic conflict pitting Arab militias against black rebels and farmers," Ban wrote in The Washington Post. "Look to its roots, though, and you discover a more complex dynamic."

Rainfall in Sudan began declining two decades ago, a phenomenon due "to some degree, from man-made global warming," said Ban, who has made both Darfur and climate change priorities.

Settled farmers and Arab nomadic herders had gotten along until the drought, he wrote, but as conditions worsened, water and food shortages disrupted the peace and "evolved into the full-fledged tragedy we witness today."

Ban said similar ecological problems are behind conflicts in other countries, including Somalia and Ivory Coast.

More than 200,000 people have been killed in Darfur since 2003, when local rebels took up arms against the Sudanese government, accusing it of decades of neglect. Sudanese leaders are accused of unleashing the pro-government Arab militia, known as the janjaweed, a charge the government denies.

After months of U.N. and Western pressure, Sudan agreed in the past week to allow a joint U.N.-African Union force of up to 19,000 peacekeepers to replace the 7,000-member AU mission now in Darfur.

Ban called the agreement "significant progress" after "four years of diplomatic inertia." But he warned that a long-term solution was needed for "the essential dilemma" — the scarcity of good land.

"Any peace in Darfur must be built on solutions that go to the root causes of the conflict," he said.

The U.N. chief called for sustained economic development, possibly involving new irrigation and water storage techniques and efforts to improve health, education and roads.

"The international community needs to help organize these efforts, teaming with the Sudanese government as well as the international aid agencies and nongovernmental organizations working so heroically on the ground," Ban said.

Source:AP


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